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LCC- Marker / Rendering Basic Shapes

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Basic Architecture Rendering using Markers by Arch Ian Jay Bantilan

Markers are a very useful tool in rendering. There are many a trick to mastering the marker and it requires constant practice. You must also understand that markers are not like Coloring Books. Most people pick up a marker and then assume that every little element of the drawing needs to be filled with color. This is not so. Why? Well I think there are 2 reasons….

Leaving White Patches

Leaving White Patches

. . .First, white patches and light have a visual effect. The mind assumes that the object colour remains but the region is just a highlight. second, leaving some white while having quick and confident strokes with a marker lends itself to having an exciting and interesting sketch.

The whole render can look exciting even for a plain box or cylinder. Material Needed for this Project:

  1. 3 Wide Markers – Light, Midtone, Dark (15%, 30%, 50% greys should work)
  2. Prismacolor pencil
  3. Markers
  4. Ruler

Let’s start with the Base Sketch Drawing.

Basic Marker Shapes Step01

Basic Marker Shapes Step01

Then Trace the Edges.

Basic Marker Shapes  Step03

Basic Marker Shapes Step03

The shading on the left is decent but it’s coloring every part of the box. It’s static and lifeless. The shading on the right is done by applying the marker to the object line by line using the widest part of the chisel tip of the marker. Your markers typically have two tips –  a chisel and a bullet tip. The chisel tip is the business end of the marker we’ll be using (it’s the fat end of the marker) It’s good to use when shading because you can cover a larger area more quickly without being too fussy. If we were to use the bullet tip to shade a object, the drawing would quickly become busy and confusing to the viewer. Remember, we are trying to communicate to and captivate the viewer when we sketch. I begin my taking the lightest of my 3-value set of markers (in my case, a copic marker I found) and outlining the shape of the form I am about to color. I do this again to help with bleed of the marker. it isn’t necessary, but I find that it helps me out when I am shading something in. As always, DRAW WITH YOUR SHOULDER. You’ll find that if you do this, your lines will br crisper and more decisive. It’s especially important here as the marker application will be done all by hand with the exception of a few ruled in pencil lines.

Using the Wedge Shape

Using the Wedge Shape

Notice that the edge of the chisel tip of the marker is in line with that front edge of the cube. Doing so helps be minimize overrunning as I apply my strokes. Finding the correct angle when applying your strokes is key to having a cleaner drawing.

Basic Marker Shapes Step04

Basic Marker Shapes Step04

I’ve now aplied marker to the two faces that face away from the main light source. Notice that not everything is shaded in. Light never hits or covers the face of an object evenly and there perhaps is some reflected or ambient light in the scene as well.

Basic Marker Shapes Step05

Basic Marker Shapes Step05

Next,  apply marker to the sides that are still in shadow, but less so than the ones directly away from my light source (the side on the left). It’s important to understand one principle as you do this. The only way you’ll be able to achieve some good depth and contrast in your sketch is by putting your lightest lights against your darkest darks… what this means is that already you can see some good contrast from top of the box to the site. This contrast tells our brains that there’s something different here, and that coupled with the correct perspective is enough for the viewer to read this drawing as a box.

Basic Marker Shapes Step06

Basic Marker Shapes Step06

Once I’ve applied the marker to the sides of the box, I can begin pumping my contrast a bit more and filling in some shadows. As you can see, based on the direction of the light and projection of the shadows, the inside of the box would also be in shadow. I’ve indicated where this shadow would be in the side by drawing in a line on the inner right face of the cube and then shading that area. As for how yo calculate this, look at the direction of the light or shadow that is cast and extrapolate from that where the inner shadow would be. Once I’m satisfied with the contrast on the side of the cube, I begin outlining the shadow with a super dark marker (like an 80% grey). The shadow that is cast on the ground will be the darkest value in the marker sketch.

Basic Marker Shapes Step07

Basic Marker Shapes Step07

Notice again that the tip of the marker is parallel to the edge or line that I am coloring against. This helps with bleed. This particular marker brand, Chartpak or AD, tends to bleed alot and you’ll have to be even quicker with your stroke than you would with a prismacolor marker.

Pointed Tip

Pointed Tip

Once the shadow is shaded in, I tighten up the outside edges of the cube with a ruler. No, this is not cheating. Adding sharper crisper lines to your sketch render will help feel it less sloppy. Be careful however as adding too many defined lines can suck the life out of the sketch render.

Adding Pencil Touches n the Shadow

Adding Pencil Touches n the Shadow

As always, I’m outlining the shape of the background first, then using the broadest part of the marker to then fill in the background. I am making an exception to the role here about filling in. Why? By filling in the background with a solid color, it not only contrasts with the cube in color but contrasts in style as well giving the sketch even more contrast.

Basic Marker Shapes Step11

Basic Marker Shapes Step11

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Basic Marker Shapes 12

Basic Marker Shapes 12

Then you can finally appreciate the work you have done.

finalsteps

finalsteps

Author: Archian

An Architect, Blogger and Strategic Thinker

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